Discussion:
Aurora Tonight
(too old to reply)
Richard
2003-10-14 22:40:30 UTC
Permalink
Hi All

Very bright aurora seen this evening with a double arc with a base
height of about 15deg and azimuth range of about 300-040 deg. Top of
display about 40-45 deg. Very bright patches at extreme ends of
display around 10:25pm local time with some horizontal movement of
features.

Could be a good sign of things to come this winter. I know I am lucky
enough to live very north in the UK but if you live in the south do
not think you will never see an aurora. I have seen excellent photos
taken of a display observed from Chichester.

If you want to know more about making observations of the aurora and
to see a few images I have taken from the UK please visit my website
at;

www.morayskies.ontheweb.com

Sorry if you have problems accessing the site, BT are giving me a poor
service.

Richard
57' 42" N, 3' 26"W
Michael A. Covington
2003-10-15 00:11:15 UTC
Permalink
Thanks for the alert. I'm cross-posting this on sci.astro.amateur because
this indicates a good chance of an aurora in the United States. England is
farther from the North Magnetic Pole than most of the U.S., even the South.
Post by Richard
Hi All
Very bright aurora seen this evening with a double arc with a base
height of about 15deg and azimuth range of about 300-040 deg. Top of
display about 40-45 deg. Very bright patches at extreme ends of
display around 10:25pm local time with some horizontal movement of
features.
Could be a good sign of things to come this winter. I know I am lucky
enough to live very north in the UK but if you live in the south do
not think you will never see an aurora. I have seen excellent photos
taken of a display observed from Chichester.
If you want to know more about making observations of the aurora and
to see a few images I have taken from the UK please visit my website
at;
www.morayskies.ontheweb.com
Sorry if you have problems accessing the site, BT are giving me a poor
service.
Richard
57' 42" N, 3' 26"W
Dan Wenz
2003-10-15 00:43:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by Michael A. Covington
Thanks for the alert. I'm cross-posting this on sci.astro.amateur because
this indicates a good chance of an aurora in the United States. England is
farther from the North Magnetic Pole than most of the U.S., even the South.
So naturally it's raining here in Maryland, USA :-(
Richard DeLuca
2003-10-15 00:48:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dan Wenz
So naturally it's raining here in Maryland, USA :-(
Ditto here in NY.......:(
John McRoberts
2003-10-15 16:32:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Michael A. Covington
Thanks for the alert. I'm cross-posting this on sci.astro.amateur because
this indicates a good chance of an aurora in the United States. England is
farther from the North Magnetic Pole than most of the U.S., even the South.
Post by Richard
Hi All
Very bright aurora seen this evening with a double arc with a base
height of about 15deg and azimuth range of about 300-040 deg. Top of
display about 40-45 deg. Very bright patches at extreme ends of
display around 10:25pm local time with some horizontal movement of
features.
Could be a good sign of things to come this winter. I know I am lucky
enough to live very north in the UK but if you live in the south do
not think you will never see an aurora. I have seen excellent photos
taken of a display observed from Chichester.
If you want to know more about making observations of the aurora and
to see a few images I have taken from the UK please visit my website
at;
www.morayskies.ontheweb.com
Sorry if you have problems accessing the site, BT are giving me a poor
service.
Richard
57' 42" N, 3' 26"W
Has the north pole slipped, I thought most of the US was south of 49th
parallel, whereas most of england is north of the 50th.

That is unless Alaska is most of the US.

John
Chris L Peterson
2003-10-15 16:47:08 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 15 Oct 2003 17:32:18 +0100, "John McRoberts"
Post by John McRoberts
Has the north pole slipped, I thought most of the US was south of 49th
parallel, whereas most of england is north of the 50th.
That is unless Alaska is most of the US.
The magnetic pole is what matters for auroras, and that is well south of the
rotational pole, under North America.

_________________________________________________

Chris L Peterson
Cloudbait Observatory
http://www.cloudbait.com
John McRoberts
2003-10-15 17:33:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Chris L Peterson
On Wed, 15 Oct 2003 17:32:18 +0100, "John McRoberts"
Post by John McRoberts
Has the north pole slipped, I thought most of the US was south of 49th
parallel, whereas most of england is north of the 50th.
That is unless Alaska is most of the US.
The magnetic pole is what matters for auroras, and that is well south of the
rotational pole, under North America.
_________________________________________________
Chris L Peterson
Cloudbait Observatory
http://www.cloudbait.com
After some google research its approximately 82deg North, 112deg W.
curtesy of http://www.geolab.nrcan.gc.ca/geomag/northpole_e.shtml

John
Stephen Tonkin
2003-10-15 17:19:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by John McRoberts
Has the north pole slipped, I thought most of the US was south of 49th
parallel, whereas most of england is north of the 50th.
The North Magnetic Pole is near Baffin Island, IIRC, not at the
Geographic North Pole. Michael was entirely correct.

Best,
Stephen

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Richard
2003-10-15 22:14:53 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 15 Oct 2003 18:19:58 +0100, Stephen Tonkin
Post by Stephen Tonkin
Post by John McRoberts
Has the north pole slipped, I thought most of the US was south of 49th
parallel, whereas most of england is north of the 50th.
The North Magnetic Pole is near Baffin Island, IIRC, not at the
Geographic North Pole. Michael was entirely correct.
Best,
Stephen
This is why the peak time for an auroral display, geomagnetic
midnight, is around 2200UT and not 0000UT. If you think about the
position of the UK, the North Magnetic Pole and the Sun you will
realise that at 2200UT they are all pretty much in a straight line and
this is when the UK is going to be at its deepest inside the auroral
zone.

I hope this makes sense.

Regards
Richard
www.morayskies.ontheweb.com
57' 42" N, 3' 26" W

Gavin Whittaker
2003-10-15 08:47:02 UTC
Permalink
Richard <***@btopenworld.com> writted:


: Very bright aurora seen this evening with a double arc with a base
: height of about 15deg and azimuth range of about 300-040 deg. Top of
: display about 40-45 deg. Very bright patches at extreme ends of
: display around 10:25pm local time with some horizontal movement of
: features.

Yup, watched it around 11:00-12:00pm, from the Scoyttish Borders. On a
moonless night, this would have been quite something, but for me it was
quite washed out by moonlight on thin high-level cloud.
Still, I saw more than the guys in the NE US!

: Could be a good sign of things to come this winter.

Let's hope so.

ATB,

Gavin
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